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Apprendre à utiliser Facebook

Articles par auteur

Chretien, KC., Farnan, JM., Greysen, R., Kind, T. (2011). To Friend or not to Friend? Social networking and faculty perceptions of online professionalismAcademic Medicine, 86 (12), 1545-1550.

DiVall, MV., Kirwin, JL (2012). Using Facebook to Facilitate Course-Related Discussion Between Students and Faculty Members. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 76, (2), Article 32.

Gray K, Annabell L, Kennedy G. (2010). Medical students’ use of Facebook to support learning: insights from four case studies. Med Teach. 32(12):971-976.

Jaffar, AA. (2013). Exploring the use of a facebook page in anatomy education. Anat Sci Educ. Sep 10. doi: 10.1002/ase.1404. [Epub ahead of print]

George, DR. (2011) “Friending Facebook?” A minicourse on the use of social media by health professionals. Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions 31:3, 215-219.

Maisonneuve, H., Rougerie, F., Chambe, H. (2015). Facebook: un outil d’apprentissage en éducation médicale? Pédagogie Médicale, 16 (1), 65-77.

Manca, S., Ranieri, M. (2013). Is it a tool suitable for learning? A critical review of the literature on Facebook as a technology-enhanced learning environment. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning 29:6, 487-504.

Metzger, AH., Finley, KN., Ulbrich,TR., McAuley, JW. (2010). Pharmacy faculty members’ perspectives on the student/faculty relationship in online social networks. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 74, (10), Article 188.

Sarapin, SH., Morris, PL. (2015). Faculty and Facebook friending : Instructor-student online social communication from the professor’s perspective. Internet and Higher Education, 27, 14-23.

Thompson LA, Kawson K, Ferdig R. (2008). The intersection of online social networking with medical professionalism. J Gen Intern Med.23(7):954-957.

Tower, M., Latimer, S., Hewitt, J. (2013) Social networking as a learning tool : Nursing students perception of efficacy. Nurse Education Today. Online November 15, 2013.

White, J., Kirwan, P., Lai, K., Walton, J., Ross, S. (2013). « Have you seen what is on Facebook ? » The use of social networking software by healthcare professions studentsBMJ Open 2013;3:e003013 doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003013.

Articles par thème

1. Développement professionnel
2. Recensement des écrits
3. Sondages, focus groups, entrevues: Perceptions, attitudes
4. Utilisation de Facebook dans un cours ou programme: exemples concrets

1. Développement professionnel

George, DR. (2011) “Friending Facebook?” A minicourse on the use of social media by health professionals. Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions 31:3, 215-219.

Introduction :Health professionals are working in an era of social technologies that empower users to generate content in real time. This article describes a 3-part continuing education minicourse called « Friending Facebook? » undertaken at Penn State Hershey Medical Center that aimed to model the functionality of current technologies in health care and encourage discussion about how health professionals might responsibly utilize social media. Methods: Fifteen health professionals participated in the course and provided written evaluation at its conclusion. The course instructor took field notes during each of the 3 classes to document emergent themes. Results: The course received uniformly positive evaluations, and participants identified several current tools perceived as being potentially useful in their professional lives, including news aggregators, Google Alerts, and–if used responsibly–social networking sites such as Facebook. Discussion: Developing innovative and appropriate programming that teaches to emerging social media technologies and ideologies will be crucial to helping the health professions adapt to a new, networked era. Medical institutions would do well to foster interprofessional-and perhaps even intergenerational-conversations to share not only the dangers and risks of social media, but also the opportunities that are emerging out of a rapidly evolving online world.

2. Recensement des écrits

Di Capua, I. (2012). A literature review of research on Facebook use. The Open Communication Journal, 6, 37-42.

This paper represents a review of more than one hundred studies on the social networking website Facebook. An initial selection has been made and has led to the identification of eight main research themes: effects on the users, friendship, construction of impressions, privacy, use, Facebook and politics, self-expression and construal, social capital, and the merging of social spheres. This paper focuses on Facebook use, which is currently the most researched theme. How do individuals use Facebook and why? Six different categories are identified: initiating and maintaining relationships, learning about others, recognition, personality and willingness to communicate, social influence, and experience. The major studies for each category are presented, with an emphasis on the most influential ones in the field. The focus of this literary review is on the commonalities and differences that arise from the results. Hypotheses are presented when possible, and a few theoretical explanations are provided. As a result, one could notice that Facebook is mainly used to keep in touch with other people, but not in a conventional way as users tend to ‘spy’ on other users’ profiles. This phenomenon leads to a growing exhibitionism, which is in turn related to individuals’ personality traits. Use of Facebook is also influenced by peers and experience with the website. A few limitations are discussed, and gender is found to be a possible factor influencing Facebook use. Suggestions for further study are provided.

Maisonneuve, H., Rougerie, F., Chambe, H. (2015). Facebook: un outil d’apprentissage en éducation médicale? Pédagogie Médicale, 16 (1), 65-77.

Contexte : La génération actuelle d’étudiants en santé fait partie des digital natives. Ils ont une appétence naturelle pour les technologies de l’information et de la communication pour l’enseignement (TICE). La majorité des étudiants utilisent les réseaux sociaux dans un cadre personnel. Les fonctionnalités de Facebook sont équivalentes à celles des plateformes électroniques. Il paraît possible de l’utiliser dans la formation médicale. Buts : L’objectif principal de ce travail était de faire une mise au point sur l’utilisation de Facebook en tant qu’outil pédagogique dans le cadre de la formation médicale. L’objectif secondaire était de discuter de ses potentialités de soutien motivationnel dans un dispositif pédagogique de formation en médecine. Méthodes : Une revue de la littérature scientifique a été réalisée. Cette recherche a été complétée par une étude de la littérature grise. Sur les 73 articles sélectionnés, 40 répondaient aux critères d’inclusion. Résultats : Les points positifs de Facebook dans ce dispositif étaient : une maîtrise de l’outil, l’esprit d’initiative des étudiants, la production de synthèse et aide au développement d’une « intelligence collective ». Les limites retrouvées étaient : la peur de partager son travail, le regard de l’enseignant sur le profil des étudiants, la perte de la limite entre vie privée et vie publique, la distractibilité des étudiants. Nous proposons un modèle de dispositif pédagogique utilisant Facebook. Ce modèle est susceptible d’agir positivement sur le profil motivationnel des apprenants. Conclusion : Facebook peut être utilisé comme un outil d’apprentissage en éducation médicale. Sa mise en application dans un enseignement hybride lui fournit un potentiel motivationnel.

Manca, S., Ranieri, M. (2013). Is it a tool suitable for learning? A critical review of the literature on Facebook as a technology-enhanced learning environment. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning 29:6, 487-504.

Despite its continuing popularity as the social network site par excellence, the educational value of Facebook has not been fully determined, and results from the mainstream educational paradigms are contradictory, with some scholars emphasizing its pedagogical affordances (e.g., widening context of learning, mixing information and learning resources, hybridization of expertise) and others cautioning against its use for educational purposes. Moreover, systematic reviews about documented educational usage of Facebook as a learning environment are lacking. This article attempts to provide a critical overview of current studies focusing on the use of Facebook as a technology-enhanced learning environment, with the aim of exploring the extent to which its pedagogical potential is actually translated into practice. Only empirical studies published in peer-reviewed academic journals with a specific focus on Facebook as a learning environment have been considered for the review. The authors conducted a comprehensive literature search that identified 23 relevant articles that were subsequently analysed according to a simplified list of guidelines. These articles were further analysed and recoded through a set of emerging categories. The results show that pedagogical affordances of Facebook have only been partially implemented and that there are still many obstacles that may prevent a full adoption of Facebook as a learning environment such as implicit institutional, teacher and student pedagogies, and cultural issues. Finally, a broad observation on the implications of the study is developed with some suggestions for future research.

 3. Sondages, focus groups, entrevues: Perceptions, attitudes

Chretien, KC., Farnan, JM., Greysen, R., Kind, T. (2011). To Friend or not to Friend? Social networking and faculty perceptions of online professionalism. Academic Medicine, 86 (12), 1545-1550.

Purpose: To assess faculty perceptions of professional boundaries and trainee-posted content on social networking sites (SNS). Method: In June 2010, the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine conducted its annual survey of U.S. and Canadian member institutions. The survey included sections on demographics and social networking. The authors used descriptive statistics and tests of association to analyze the Likert scale responses and qualitatively analyzed the free-text responses. Results: Of 110 institutional members, 82 (75%) responded to the survey. Of the 40 respondents who reported current or past SNS use, 21 (53%) reported receiving a “friend request” from a current student and 25 (63%) from a current resident. Of these, 4 (19%) accepted the student request and 12 (48%) accepted the resident request. Sixty-three of 80 (79%) felt it was inappropriate to send a friend request to a current student, 61 (76%) to accept a current student’s request, 42 (53%) to become friends with a current resident, and 61 (81%) to become friends with a current patient. Becoming friends with a former student, former resident, or colleague was perceived as more appropriate. Younger respondents were less likely to deem specific student behaviors inappropriate (odds ratio [OR] 0.18–0.79; adjusted OR 0.12–0.86, controlling for respondents’ sex, rank, and SNS use), although none reached statistical significance. Conclusions: Some internal medicine educators are using SNSs and interacting with trainees online. Their perceptions on the appropriateness of social networking behaviors provide some consensus for professional boundaries between faculty and trainees in the digital world.

Gray K, Annabell L, Kennedy G. (2010). Medical students’ use of Facebook to support learning: insights from four case studies. Med Teach. 32(12):971-976.

Background: Recent research indicates that university students are interested and active in supporting their learning by using Facebook, a popular social networking website. Aim: This study aimed to add to our understanding of how or how effectively students may be using Facebook for this purpose. Method: Researchers surveyed the extent and key features of Facebook use among 759 medical students at one university, and explored in depth the design and conduct of four Facebook study groups. Results: 25.5% of students reported using Facebook for education related reasons and another 50.0% said they were open to doing so. The case studies showed conservative approaches in students’ efforts to support their development of medical knowledge, skills and attributes in this way. Both technological affordances and group dynamics were factors contributing to groups’ mixed successes. Conclusion: These cases indicate that using Facebook as part of learning and teaching is as much of a challenge for many students as it may be for most educators.

Metzger, AH., Finley, KN., Ulbrich,TR., McAuley, JW. (2010). Pharmacy faculty members’ perspectives on the student/faculty relationship in online social networks. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 74, (10), Article 188.

Objective. To describe pharmacy faculty members’ use of the online social network Facebook and compare the perspectives of faculty members with and without Facebook profiles regarding student/ faculty relationships. Methods. An electronic survey instrument was sent to full-time faculty members (n = 183) at 4 colleges of pharmacy in Ohio seeking their opinions on student/faculty relationships on Facebook. If respondents answered  »yes » to having a Facebook profile, they were asked 14 questions on aspects of being  »friends » with students. If respondents answered  »no, » they were asked 4 questions. Results. Of the 95 respondents (52%) to the survey instrument, 44 faculty members (46%) had a Facebook profile, while 51 faculty members (54%) did not. Those who had a profile had been faculty members for an average of 8.6 years, versus 11.4 years for those who did not have a Facebook profile. Seventy-nine percent of faculty members who used Facebook were not  »friends » with their students. The majority of respondents reported that they would decline/ignore a  »friend » request from a student, or decline until after the student graduated. Although a limited number of faculty members had used Facebook for online discussions, teaching purposes, or student organizations, the majority of universities did not have policies on the use of social networking sites. Conclusion. Online social network sites are used widely by students and faculty members, which may raise questions regarding professionalism and appropriate faculty/student relationships. Further research should address the student/preceptor relationship, other online social networking sites, and whether students are interested in using these sites within the classroom and/or professional organizations.

Sarapin, SH., Morris, PL. (2015). Faculty and Facebook friending : Instructor-student online social communication from the professor’s perspective. Internet and Higher Education, 27, 14-23.

U.S. college faculty with Facebook profiles (N = 308) were surveyed about their expectations of students’ perceptions of their credibility, professionalism, and approachability in the classroom, as well as mutual connectedness with their instructors, resulting from out-of-classroom socializing with them and teacher self-disclosure on Facebook. Consistent with uses and gratifications theory, these teacher attributes made up the Professors’ Expected Relationship Compensation scale (PERC), which was correlated to professors’ frequency of Facebook interaction with students (r = 0.41, p < 0.001). Multiple regression confirmed the persistence of this large-sized effect after accounting for the influence of six other variables, including instructors’ level of self-disclosure. These characteristics have been shown to relate positively to student-reported enhancements of academic outcomes and satisfaction. Faculty participation in non-academic, online interaction through Facebook shows great promise for augmenting student perceptions of their college experience and academic performance because it aligns professors’ uses with students’ expectations.

Thompson LA, Kawson K, Ferdig R. (2008). The intersection of online social networking with medical professionalism. J Gen Intern Med.23(7):954-957.

Aim: To measure the frequency and content of online social networking among medical students and residents. Methods: Using the online network Facebook, we evaluated online profiles of all medical students (n = 501) and residents (n = 312) at the University of Florida, Gainesville. Objective measures included the existence of a profile, whether it was made private, and any personally identifiable information. Subjective outcomes included photographic content, affiliated social groups, and personal information not generally disclosed in a doctor-patient encounter. Results: Social networking with Facebook is common among medical trainees, with 44.5% having an account. Medical students used it frequently (64.3%) and residents less frequently (12.8%, p < .0001). The majority of accounts (83.3%) listed at least 1 form of personally identifiable information, only a third (37.5%) were made private, and some accounts displayed potentially unprofessional material. There was a significant decline in utilization of Facebook as trainees approached medical or residency graduation (first year as referent, years 3 and 4, p < .05). Discussion: While social networking in medical trainees is common in the current culture of emerging professionals, a majority of users allow anyone to view their profile. With a significant proportion having subjectively inappropriate content, ACGME competencies in professionalism must include instruction on the intersection of personal and professional identities.

Tower, M., Latimer, S., Hewitt, J. (2013) Social networking as a learning tool : Nursing students perception of efficacy. Nurse Education Today. Online November 15, 2013.

Background : The pedagogical use of social networking technology in education is of growing interest to academics as a potential teaching and learning tool. However, the educational use of social networking sites such as Facebook is still under explored. Nursing students often perceive bioscience subjects as difficult and lack self-efficacy in their ability to be successful. In this case, as the final assessment for a bioscience related subject approached, students became increasingly anxious about their ability to perform in the assessment item. To better support students, a Facebook group was formed. Objectives : The aim of the study was to examine students’ perceptions of the efficacy of using Facebook as a tool to support study. Design : A convenience sample of BN students (n = 533 across 3 campuses), enrolled in the subject Medications and Safe Administration, were invited to join. 373 BN students joined the group (70% of the student cohort). A solution-focussed orientation underpinned the management of the group. Methods : A descriptive, online survey was administered following release of students’ results for the final assessment item to assess students’ perceptions of how effective the group had been in helping them learn. The survey contained both quantitative and qualitative questions. Responses were received from 89 students (24%). Survey data were analysed descriptively and qualitative data were analysed thematically by the academic team. Results : Students perceived the group to be an innovative method of study support that guided learning by enhancing self-efficacy in their learning. Students also described how it was useful in promoting peer learning and engaging with academics. Conclusions : Social media platforms such as Facebook have the potential to enhance students’ self-efficacy in learning and can support students to develop their learning to a deeper level.

White, J., Kirwan, P., Lai, K., Walton, J., Ross, S. (2013). « Have you seen what is on Facebook ? » The use of social networking software by healthcare professions students. BMJ Open 2013;3:e003013 doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003013.

Objective The use of social networking software has become ubiquitous in our society. The aim of this study was to explore the attitudes and experiences of healthcare professional students using Facebook at our school, to determine if there is a need for development of policy to assist students in this area. Design A mixed-methods approach was employed, using semistructured interviews to identify themes which were explored using an online survey. A combination of descriptive statistics and thematic analysis was used for analysis. Setting Healthcare professions education programmes at a large Canadian university. Participants Students of medicine, nursing, pharmacy, speech and language pathology, occupational therapy, physical therapy, dentistry, dental hygiene and medical laboratory Science were invited to participate. 14 participants were interviewed, and 682 participants responded to an online survey; the female:male balance was 3 : 1. Results 14 interviews were analysed in-depth, and 682 students responded to the survey (17% response rate). 93% reported current Facebook use. Themes identified included patterns of use and attitudes to friendship, attitudes to online privacy, breaches of professional behaviour on Facebook and attitudes to guidelines relating to Facebook use. A majority considered posting of the following material unprofessional: use of alcohol/drugs, crime, obscenity/nudity/sexual content, patient/client information, criticism of others. 44% reported seeing such material posted by a colleague, and 27% reported posting such material themselves. A majority of participants agreed that guidelines for Facebook use would be beneficial. Conclusions Social networking software use, specifically Facebook use, was widespread among healthcare students at our school who responded to our survey. Our results highlight some of the challenges which can accompany the use of this new technology and offer potential insights to help understand the pedagogy and practices of Facebook use in this population, and to help students navigate the dilemmas associated with becoming 21st century healthcare professionals.

4. Utilisation de Facebook dans un cours ou programme: exemples concrets

DiVall, MV., Kirwin, JL (2012). Using Facebook to Facilitate Course-Related Discussion Between Students and Faculty Members. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 76, (2), Article 32.

Objectives. To use Facebook to facilitate online discussion of the content of a Comprehensive Disease Management course and to evaluate student use and perceptions of this exercise. Design. A Facebook page was created and coordinators encouraged students to “like” the page and to post and view study tips, links, or questions. At the end of the course, students’ use and perceptions were evaluated using an anonymous survey tool. Assessment. At the end of week 1, there were 81 followers, 5 wall posts, and 474 visits to the course Facebook page. At peak use, the page had 117 followers, 18 wall posts, and 1,326 visits. One hundred nineteen students (97% of the class) completed the survey tool. Twenty-six percent of students contributed posts compared to 11% who posted on the course discussion board on Blackboard. Students were more likely to post and be exposed to posts on Facebook than on Blackboard. Students found Facebook helpful and 57% said they would miss Facebook if use was not continued in subsequent courses. Conclusions. Students in a Comprehensive Disease Management course found the addition of a Facebook page a valuable study tool and thought most posts added to their learning.

Jaffar, AA. (2013). Exploring the use of a facebook page in anatomy education. Anat Sci Educ. Sep 10. doi: 10.1002/ase.1404. [Epub ahead of print]

Facebook is the most popular social media site visited by university students on a daily basis. Consequently, Facebook is the logical place to start with for integrating social media technologies into education. This study explores how a faculty-administered Facebook Page can be used to supplement anatomy education beyond the traditional classroom. Observations were made on students’ perceptions and effectiveness of using the Page, potential benefits and challenges of such use, and which Insights metrics best reflect user’s engagement. The Human Anatomy Education Page was launched on Facebook and incorporated into anatomy resources for 157 medical students during two academic years. Students’ use of Facebook and their perceptions of the Page were surveyed. Facebook’s « Insights » tool was also used to evaluate Page performance during a period of 600 days. The majority of in-class students had a Facebook account which they adopted in education. Most students perceived Human Anatomy Education Page as effective in contributing to learning and favored « self-assessment » posts. The majority of students agreed that Facebook could be a suitable learning environment. The « Insights » tool revealed globally distributed fans with considerable Page interactions. The use of a faculty-administered Facebook Page provided a venue to enhance classroom teaching without intruding into students’ social life. A wider educational use of Facebook should be adopted not only because students are embracing its use, but for its inherent potentials in boosting learning. The « Insights » metrics analyzed in this study might be helpful when establishing and evaluating the performance of education-oriented Facebook Pages.